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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 11:05 am 
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https://beta.racingpost.com/bloodstock/ ... ing/271371

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 1:58 pm 
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It's difficult to discern whether the major concern at the root of this item on the ITBF's agenda is genomic testing in general or just testing for "the speed gene" (a single nucleotide polymorphism at a specific location in intron 1 of the MSTN gene on equine chromosome 18). Use of that term is proprietarial to a single company. Only they can (and do) license studs to advertise status of their stallions at "the speed gene". Thing is, all by itself that intron 1 variant didn't turn out to be especially informative about speed or aptitude.

Further to the quote from Ronan Murphy, I'd say the industry must come to understand this technology and how it can be applied in the best interests of all concerned, including the breed itself.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 12:52 am 
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Reading it, the main objection is that the ITBF don't want a stud book somewhere in the world to enter into an agreement with a company to do any analysis of performance on horses whose DNA was collected for registration purposes only, but whose DNA still exists.

Quote:
Leadon noted that genomic companies have sought genetic data acquired during thoroughbred registrations for use in determining which genes provide superior racing performance


My understanding is that a commercial genomics operation had approached a Stud Book about the possibility of using the DNA obtained for registration in a performance based study. Now put yourself in Coolmore's position. They own Galileo, but they didnt breed him so they have no ownership of the DNA that was used to confirm his parentage as a foal, so if a genomics company came to an agreement with the Irish Stud Book for example, whom I presume would still have his DNA stored in some way, they could use the DNA obtained to register the horse in a study on performance, like say looking at why Galileo is Galileo (a champion racehorse and sire) and not King of Kings or Entrepreneur, and Coolmore would have no say in its use in the study, nor any benefit of its results.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2017 9:48 am 
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brogers wrote:
Reading it, the main objection is that the ITBF don't want a stud book somewhere in the world to enter into an agreement with a company to do any analysis of performance on horses whose DNA was collected for registration purposes only, but whose DNA still exists.


That's a slippery slope and in its context this para is a bit worrisome..
Quote:
However, other votes acknowledged that genomics has been shown to be of value in the identification of predisposition to disease and other health issues and that consideration should be given to use of the science in collaboration with academic institutions.

..given the existing overlap of academic and commercial interests.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 7:13 pm 
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Seems to me that they could just pass a rule that their DNA samples for registration purposes could not be used for commercial purposes EVER and could only be used for scientific research fifty years after the horse was registered. Or some lesser period, but fifty years sounds good to me. The horse's DNA would have little commercial value after that many horse generations had passed. Unless some new diseases pop up, fifty year old DNA would be just as valuable as yesterday's.

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