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PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2010 8:59 pm 
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Today our trainer was very busy or I wouldhave asked him he told us that our three year old filly tied up this morning after her morning jog...said she has recently become a nervous girl, and they are going to explore many options...feed choice, amount of feed and when they feed. Is this term similar to Colick?? what would be her symptoms if he caught it early like he said and does this mean she is unhappy? I raised her at home big mistake she is my baby...she has had good solid timed workouts for just beginning her career...then all of a sudden this came on she has been there little over a month....our trainer is very cautious and in time he will tell me the details...but tonight just sitting here I worried about her. thankyou for any explamation.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 13, 2010 5:24 am 
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This is a pretty good explaination:

http://www.thehorse.com/pdf/factsheets/ ... ing-up.pdf

It seems to happen to all performance horses at one time or another. Nervousness does seem to contribute to the frequency too.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2010 7:19 pm 
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Brogan wrote:
It seems to happen to all performance horses at one time or another.


I'm not sure where you got your information but this is absolutely untrue. While tying up is not uncommon, it does not happen to all performance horses.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:04 pm 
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I had a gelding who tied up the first time he worked and then every time he trained for about 3 weeks afterwards. We did all sorts of tests, he was just coming back from an injury and was stressed, and not fully fit. I put him onto a different feed program, upped his salt intake, decreased carbs increased fats, put him on the Recovery EQ (worked awesome, love hte stuff) as well as Sinew-X, Vantiox, Anti-Flam and Healthy horse by Omega Alpha. I also had him on Dantrolene for about a week every day before he trained to help relax him He came around in 2 weeks and never looked back. Unfortunaltey he got hurt pulling up from a work and I retired him.
Here is what the Merck Vet manual says about Tying up (Exertional Rhabdomylosis)The most common cause of sporadic tying-up is exercise that exceeds the horse’s underlying state of training. The incidence of muscle stiffness also has increased during an outbreak of respiratory disease. Deficiencies of sodium, calcium, vitamin E, or selenium in the diet may also be contributory factors.
A diagnosis of sporadic exertional rhabdomyolysis is made on the basis of a horse with no previous history of exertional rhabdomyolysis, signs of muscle cramping and stiffness following exercise, and moderate to marked elevations in serum CK and AST. Immediately on detection of signs of exertional rhabdomyolysis, exercise should cease and the horse should be moved to a well-bedded stall with access to fresh water. The objectives of treatment are to relieve anxiety and muscle pain, as well as to correct fluid and acid-base deficits. Tranquilizers, opioids, or NSAID may be given. Most horses are relatively pain free within 18-24 hr.
Severe rhabdomyolysis can lead to renal compromise due to ischemia and the combined nephrotoxic effects of myoglobinuria, dehydration, and NSAID therapy. The first priority in horses with hemoconcentration or myoglobinuria is to reestablish fluid balance and induce diuresis. In severely affected animals, regular monitoring of BUN and/or serum creatinine is advised to assess the extent of renal damage. Diuretics are contraindicated in the absence of IV fluid therapy and are indicated if the horse is in oliguric renal failure.
Horses should be stall rested on a hay diet for a few days. For horses with sporadic forms of tying-up, rest with regular access to a paddock should continue until serum muscle enzyme concentrations are normal. Because the inciting cause is usually temporary, most horses respond to rest, a gradual increase in training, and dietary adjustment. Endurance horses should be encouraged to drink electrolyte-supplemented water during an endurance ride and monitored particularly closely during hot, humid conditions.
Recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis is seen frequently in Thoroughbreds, Standardbreds, and Arabian horses. It is likely due to abnormal regulation of intracellular calcium in skeletal muscles. It appears there is intermittent disruption of muscle contraction, particularly when horses susceptible to the condition are fit and have a nervous temperament. In Thoroughbreds, it is likely inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.
Diagnostic tests to determine the cause of chronic tying-up include a CBC, serum chemistry panel, blood vitamin E and selenium concentrations, urinalysis to determine electrolyte balance, dietary analysis, exercise testing, and muscle biopsy. An exercise challenge test is useful to detect subclinical cases. In addition, quantifying the extent of exertional rhabdomyolysis during mild exercise is helpful in deciding how rapidly to reinstate training.
Management of recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis is aimed at decreasing the triggering factors for excitement and pharmacologic alteration of intracellular calcium flux with contraction. Management changes that may decrease excitement include minimizing stall confinement by using turn-out or a hot walker, exercising and feeding horses with recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis before other horses, providing compatible equine company, and the judicious use of low-dose tranquilizers during training. A high-fat, low-starch diet is beneficial, possibly by decreasing excitement. In contrast to PSSM, horses that have recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis often require higher caloric intakes (>24 Mcal/day). At these high caloric intakes, specialized feeds designed for exertional rhabdomyolysis are necessary, as additional vegetable oil or rice bran cannot supply enough calories for athletes in intense training. Hay should be fed at 1.5-2% of body weight and high-fat, low-starch concentrates should be selected that provide ≤20% of daily digestible energy as nonstructural carbohydrate and 20-25% of digestible energy as fat.
Dantrolene (4 mg/kg, PO) given 1 hr before exercise to horses that are not fed prior to exercise may decrease the release of calcium from the calcium release channel. Phenytoin (1.4-2.7 mg/kg, PO, bid), has also been advocated as a treatment for horses with recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis. Therapeutic levels vary, so oral dosages are adjusted by monitoring serum levels to achieve between 8 µg/mL and 12 µg/mL. Longterm treatment with dantrolene or phenytoin is expensive, however.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:15 pm 
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tammysinnett wrote:
Today our trainer was very busy or I wouldhave asked him he told us that our three year old filly tied up this morning after her morning jog...said she has recently become a nervous girl, and they are going to explore many options...feed choice, amount of feed and when they feed. Is this term similar to Colick?? what would be her symptoms if he caught it early like he said and does this mean she is unhappy? I raised her at home big mistake she is my baby...she has had good solid timed workouts for just beginning her career...then all of a sudden this came on she has been there little over a month....our trainer is very cautious and in time he will tell me the details...but tonight just sitting here I worried about her. thankyou for any explamation.


Tammy please don't feel like this is your fault because you raised her. It just doesn't work like that. Horses that tie up are a puzzle and you have to play around until you find something that works for that particular horse. The place to start is the high fat/low carb diet. She may end up needing regumate if they determine the cause to be hormone related or regular injections of ESE if they think selenium levels are in play. Dantrolene can help. I had one filly that needed an ace pill every day before she trained. When we got close to the race we had to switch to a tiny bit of dormosedan. Another filly I had years ago was fine as long as the rider didn't take a hold of her. Give her a loose rein and she was happy as a clam. Hopefully your trainer is willing to play detective with the help of the vet and get to the root cause.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:29 pm 
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Sorry, I didn't address the guilt factor. As Laurierace said, don't blame yourself. This happens with a lot of TB's. especially sensitive ones that are nervy. ANd I didn't even think of the hormone influence in mares, but yes, absolutley that can play a HUGE role in it.
Just make sure you address the issue head on with your trainer and keep up with what is happening and being done to have the best effect on your horse.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:40 pm 
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I have an older mare who has Recurrent Exertional Rhabdomyolysis. I evented with her. Here's a link with good info. She's 19 now, it doesn't go away but it is manageable. Good luck Tammy
http://www.cvm.umn.edu/umec/lab/RER_new/


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 Post subject: thankyou
PostPosted: Wed Jun 16, 2010 10:58 am 
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I read all night and have read some more since, talked with the trainer yesterday and he was absolutely positve...funny thing the things you all have suggested I recognized in his conversation...so actually I felt pretty smart when he was explaining...again I thank my great teachers and comforters to this new stage in my Race horse adventurer. Love this filly, I know she has so much heart I am praying we find the answer so she can find her confidence and relax. She is of Storm Cat blood, they tell me they are racers...the good ones can be a little nervous :) cross my fingers and thankyou

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 7:15 pm 
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I think its fillies that tend tie up - more so than geldings or older mares. Part of it seems to be stress, and Lord knows at the track ANYTHING can stress a horse. Coming off a farm or training center I wouldn't be a bit surprised if it may have been the adjustment to the new environment and regimen at the track. I had one do that, and it took a couple weeks for her to get back to a new normal. Hope it works out for you

jm

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