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 Post subject: My trimming job
PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2010 3:40 pm 
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Been working on my own mare for about a year- still not perfect but we are close. There is some minor flaring that I'm working back slowly on the right at the quarter. This photo is from a few months back and they look even better now- but I am just so thrilled at the changes- better traction- NO interference at any speed, even sharp turns- and also the fact that she will never need a shoe on ANY surface. The faster they wear the faster they grow. I'm planning on making a mark at the top so I can see how fast they grow. The toe length on this mare is 3 1/2 inches.
The books that helped me do this are:
Jaime Jackson's Horse owners guide to natural hoof care
Pete Ramey's Making natural hoofcare work for you

Image


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 2:48 pm 
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My comments are about what I can see from the picture. If you want my professional opinion, you have pared the sole too much. It also looks like you've trimmed the bars back too much. If this horse is running barefoot, there is a high risk of bruising or worse. Your trim is excellent if you are going to shoe the horse.

Here a simple explantion of hoof growth.

http://www.extension.org/pages/How_a_Horse's_Hoof_Grows

You have to remember that a barefoot horse only has the sole to protect the flexible and sensitive inner hoof from damage. If you want to check to see if you have removed too much sole, take your thumb and press against the sole. If it gives in easily to the pressure, the sole is thin and needs to be protected. By protection, I mean shoe, hoof boots, or graze on soft ground. Remember, my observations are taken from the picture you provided. It does look like you've learned a lot from the books. Congratulations, doing it on your own will save you a great deal of money.

Here's a short take on the hoof also.


http://extension.missouri.edu/publicati ... px?P=G2740


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 2:55 pm 
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ArchDandy: This might help also.

http://thoughtfulhorseman.blogspot.com/ ... depth.html


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 2:55 pm 
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I have done nothing to the sole, the bottom of the foot is too hard to trim with a knife- all I do is rasp the wall. This horse has no bruises or any other issues and lives and works on hard desert floor- even goes out on the road. As for the bars- also too hard to trim with a knife- they are they way they are because the horse wore them that way. Placing a shoe on this horse would negate all that I have worked on with this horse. That part about pressing on the sole you mentioned- I do this everyday, it is as though I am trying to pinch a rock.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 2:59 pm 
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Politely I must state again- this horse has no sole issues- there is NO give when pressing on the sole, any marks you see are scraping from a sharp hoof pick- the sole on this horse is simply too hard to trim. I have retired my hoofknife for the sole use of digging out any tiny pebbles I may find lodged.

http://www.mackinawdells2.com/mustang%2 ... %20006.jpg

This is a nice example of what I'm going for, the sole on this horse is concaved and the bars are worn short


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 3:12 pm 
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I'll just have to take your word on it. Its your horse.

http://www.equipodiatry.com/article_barefoot_v_shod.htm


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 3:41 pm 
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I'd be willing to get some video of this horse moving on whatever terrain you wish. I understand this trim is NOTHING like what most people are used to- and I understand your concern- understand though- that if my horse so much as took an ouchy step on gravel- I would immediately look to a professional barefoot trimmer to remedy the situation- and to learn where I have gone wrong. As I previously stated though- this horse is totally sound, on gravel, sand, pavement, whatever we come across. If there was any tenderness- I would be concerned- but there is none. I AM planning on becoming licensed- through Jaime Jackson's course- though I do not plan on trimming for a living- barefoot horse's feet are epicly hard and back breaking to rasp. My horse used to suffer from splayed hooves, constant cracks and minor soreness- and this was while under the care of several farriers. I HAVE had my work evaulated by licensed trimmers- Notably Amy Farrel described it as better than most- which I took to mean there must be some room for improvement- but I am confident I am on the right track with this horse.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 4:12 pm 
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ArchDandy: The most important thing for you to know is that your horse is healthy and sound. It is not necessary for you to prove anything to me or anyone else. I started out as farrier over 40 years ago and nothing about horses surprises me any more.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 5:03 pm 
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Hello Arch
Living in the Desert myself I would have to say that I like your job on the underside. However if you are looking for a more thorough opinion I would like to see angles of the horses hooves myself.
Our horses feet crack and they are barefoot. I have to rasp it down from time to time. but your frog looks good, soles look good.
Karen


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 6:08 pm 
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I didn't post to prove anything- my goal if anything was to inspire people to try becoming more than just their horse's owner. The more I delve into hands on horse care- the happier my horse and I become- it is not fair for so few to enjoy something like this. Karen- are the cracks cosmetic? or is it visible from the bottom of the foot? In my limited experience I have noticed cosmetic cracks on horses who experience drastic wet/dry cycles. If the crack is deep its possible the wall in that spot is too long- the hoof will tell you if this is the case because the sole next to the crack will be flakey.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 6:13 pm 
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Arch
we do have bizzare seasons. It didnt stop snowing this year until June 4th.. and now its just dry and hot. We really do go froom one extreme to the other. I think they are cosmetic because they are really easy to get rid of.
Im sorry im not meaning to say that you need to prove anything because you dont. I saw your post and thought that i would support you because of our bizzare weather we have here.
Karen


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 6:21 pm 
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Sorry I was responding to two people at once- cosmetic cracks are just that- and when caused by weather- don't seem to be a problem. I had that issue for a while and didnt' realize at the time it was because I was soaking the hooves- now I let them stay dry all the time. There is this hoof cream/hand lotion called Hoof Alive that seems to help seal cracks and prevent new ones- but I doubt any need for it because your cracks are only on the surface.

Edited to add: Karen- I'll get more photos both of the sole and from the side- and I'll do a better job of cleaning them up this time.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:45 am 
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Arch when you're brave enough to post your own trimming job it does a service for everybody. this is done all the time at www.horseshoes.com by pro farriers who thereafter crucify their bretheren over the defective job posted. there's also extensive discussions there concerning so called "natural" trimming along with owner horror story posts as to what this child of charlatan Ingrid Strasser has wrought with horse hoofs. a butcher, in a lot of folks opinions. Personally I'd hesitate before assuming the mantle "natural trimmer", but that's just me.

my opinion of the photo--straight scoop--toe probably too long by about 1/4 inch(hinders turnover and makes horse work harder to walk), insufficient hoof wall contact with the ground--i.e. sole needs to be recessed in comparison with wall so that primarily there is wall and frog ground contact and minimal sole contact with the ground. the horse has contracted heels and narrow frog that I'd be attempting to gradually correct by leaving excess wall at the quarters. the photo looks a little mule shaped to me.

Unless you have an exceptionally thick soled horse, I'd avoid thinking in any way that a performance horse ought to be performing without shoes. Its done. hardly means the horse enjoys. best of luck in learning trimming. been there, done that. you learns as you goes!


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